Feed on
Posts
Comments

image002[2]

“Professor Meet-and-Greet” – Wed., 4/5, 12:20-1:10 pm, Judd 113

Come learn more about ongoing research on campus! PSI CHI (Wesleyan’s psychology honor society) is hosting a Professor Meet-and-Greet with Prof. Mike Robinson.

Prof. Robinson is an Assistant Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience & Behavior. His research involves the brain mechanisms of motivation, reward, and desire, including the role of these mechanisms in addictive behavior. This is a great way to get to know professors in a more informal space, to ask questions, and to get to know fellow psychology majors and non-psychology majors.

The meet-and-greet will take place on Wednesday, April 5 from 12:20-1:10 PM in Judd 113. Mondo pizza will be provided! Please RSVP by clicking here.
https://ssl.gstatic.com/ui/v1/icons/mail/images/cleardot.gif

*This event is open to all students (non-Psi Chi members, prospective psychology majors, and/or non-psychology majors are welcome to attend)

Unknown

Free CeCe Poster

Summer Session is Open!!

Summer 2017 classes include Intro to Financial Accounting, Bio, Chem, Screenwriting, International Politics, Writing with Anne Greene, and more. More information is available in WesMaps and on the Summer Session website.

To register:

1) Print and complete the registration form (EP>Student>Summer Session>Registration Form).
2) Meet with your faculty advisor to have them sign your form.
3) Bring your completed form with a check for payment to the Summer Session office (74 Wyllys) during business hours (8:30 am – 5:00 pm). You can also put the payment on your student account before bringing your form to the office.

Session schedule and deadlines are online at http://wesleyan.edu/summer/Calendar.html.

If you need any additional assistance, please contact the Summer Session office at 860-685-2005 or summer@wesleyan.edu.

Dance Major Open House

Unknown

A LECTURE SERIES SPONSORED BY
THE CERTIFICATE IN SOCIAL, CULTURAL, AND CRITICAL THEORY

In reality, “sudden” catastrophes are actually long in preparation.
They do not stand in exclusive contrast to an apparently peaceful flow
but are the outcome of a complicated, uneven evolution.

—Georg Lukács

Suleiman Mourad
on truths and fictions of Islam
TUESDAY, MARCH 7 • DOWNEY 113

Jordan Camp
on incarcerating the crisis
THURSDAY, MARCH 30 • BOGER 112

Marguerite Nguyen
on refuge and refugees
THURSDAY, MAY 4 • BOGER 112

ALL LECTURES WILL BEGIN AT 4:30PM.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE SERIES OR THE CERTIFICATE,
PLEASE CONTACT MATTHEW GARRETT (MCGARRETT@WESLEYAN.EDU).

Save the Date

Unknown

PeterMorgensternClarrenPrize copy

Why Foreign-Language Study is a Good Idea for Every Student

We assume if you have reasons to learn a particular language (to study, work, travel, or live abroad or for resources not fully available in English translation), you already know why it is important. Here are reasons to study any language besides English or whatever you regard as your native language:

1. Many employers, professional schools, and graduate schools see serious study of a second language (potentially, a double-major) as evidence that you can (a) put yourself more easily in others’ (colleagues’, clients’) shoes and (b) communicate more effectively even in English.

2. You will never know your own language and culture more deeply than by studying another–by looking at it from the outside. Learning to thrive with the unfamiliar is often linked to creativity in many intellectual and professional contexts.

3. Language learning teaches you to think more clearly and sharpens your brain’s ability to make sense of the world.

4. Deep study of another culture through its language brings home how much of value will never be made available in English.

5. Puzzling out another language and culture will help you understand (and empathize with) the difficulties of non-anglophone immigrants, colleagues, clients, and travelers in the U.S., even if you never leave American shores.

6. Learning another language well makes it easier to learn any language in the future. Even if you never need this, the experience–especially if you study abroad–will make you far more confident in your ability to face any intellectual or professional challenge.

7. Foreign-language courses fit easily into study plans: offered on highly varied schedules, they provide a stimulating (and fun!) break from problem-set driven, heavy-reading or arts courses.

Wesleyan offers:
Arabic language and culture: http://www.wesleyan.edu/academics/faculty/aaissa/profile.html
American Sign Language: http://www.wesleyan.edu/lctls/courses.html
Classics (Greek and Latin): http://wesleyan.edu/classics/
East Asian Studies (Chinese, Japanese, Korean): http://wesleyan.edu/ceas/
German studies: http://wesleyan.edu/german/
Hebrew language and culture: http://www.wesleyan.edu/academics/faculty/dkatz01/profile.html
Romance Languages & Literatures (French, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish): http://wesleyan.edu/romance/
Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies program: http://wesleyan.edu/russian/
Any other language: http://www.wesleyan.edu/lctls/silp.html

Do not hesitate to contact any faculty teaching these above language(s).

The Gordon Career Center has launched a new student funding initiative called the Career Development Grant. This serves as an expansion (and replacement) of the old SuitUp fund. Students can still ask for money to cover interview attire as before, but may now also request funds for things like graduate exam fees, career-related travel expenses, and professional conferences. They may request up to $500 over their time at Wesleyan. In general, students must be on need-based aid to qualify, though exceptions will be considered on a case-by-case basis.
You can read more here. Interested students are asked to contact Jacquie Fought (jfought01@wesleyan.edu) for an application, or Anne Santaniello (asantaniello@wesleyan.edu) if they have questions about what the fund covers, etc.

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »

Log in