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FIST232/MDST232 Obscure Enigma of Desire

Jeff Rider

MW 10:50AM-12:10PM; FISK210

This course is an introduction to the study of the ways we create meanings when we read texts. It will focus on several deliberately obscure literary texts from twelfth-century France and will examine them in the light of the classical and medieval concepts of enigma, the marvelous (wonderful), fabula, and allegory as well as some modern theoretical works about how we understand narratives. We will seek to understand why deliberate obscurity is an important part of literature and how medieval authors created narratives that seem particularly meaningful precisely because they are obscure. We will consider why we feel these texts have meaning and the ways in which we make them meaningful to us.

This course will be co-taught in parallel with a course (in English) on the same subject offered at the Charles University in Prague by Professor Lucie Dolezalova. About half of the classes will be conducted together with the class in Prague through teleconferencing and Professor Dolezalova will teach one week of the course at Wesleyan and meet with students while she is here.

Call for Submissions of Art/Performance on Disruption/Disaster

The College of the Environment Think Tank is inviting proposals for creative work on the theme of “Disaster” and the ways in which humans confront or survive disasters, to be shared with the public on Friday, March 2, 2018 in the Memorial Chapel as part of an event hosted by the COE Think Tank.
Below is the description of the themes we are working with.
Proposals can be submitted for the creation of new work, or for existing work.

We are able to offer $200 honoraria. In addition to sharing the work at the March 2 event, we will ask you to talk about your project in 8-10 minute presentation with time for audience to respond and ask questions.

Proposals are due by Thursday, February 1, midnight.
Submit to: Katja Kolcio – Kkolcio@wesleyan.edu
Selection will be determined by Tuesday, February 6.
Work must be completed by Monday, February 26 and the event will take place Friday, March 2, afternoon-evening.

Please include:
Your full name
Wesleyan University Email Address
Your Wesleyan University P.O Box # (for payment purposes only)
Your Wesleyan University ID # (for payment purposes only)
Your class year and major(s) if you have declared.
Are you an international student? (for payment purposes only)
A 300 word (maximum) description of the work. A sample of the work or other relevant work if such exists.
A description of the format and technical requirements (Performance? Exhibit? Video? Music? Etc?)

Since its inception, the Earth has had a violent history of disruption and disasters. Volcanic eruptions, transformations of the atmosphere, meteoritic collisions, mass extinctions, moving glaciers, plagues, disease, wars, politics and belief systems are but some of the perturbations, natural and otherwise, that disrupt the dynamic processes of the earth and all life that has lived on it. Natural and anthropogenic perturbations across a range of scales set the Earth, ecosystems and human communities onto different courses. While disruptions and disasters have been an integral part of the history and evolution of the planet, the relationship between humans and their environment continues to evolve as perturbations shift in frequency, magnitude and type. These perturbations arise from both non-anthropogenic and anthropogenic sources. But there is also a growing human-environment interaction that leads to disruptions and disasters at a variety of scales. While some of the anthropogenic factors depend upon technological advances (e.g., nuclear radiation) other factors are ancient (e.g., the use of fire to clear large areas for agricultural purposes, such as in Ukraine, Indonesia or South America).

Our current world offers a series of profound challenges to humanity. We are pushing our world towards a tipping point of climate change by our changes to the carbon cycle and use of fossil fuels. The social-political-ethnic-religious theater of rivalries and conflict intensifies as the environmental stage rotates. The biochemical machinery of humans and the biological world is now constantly challenged by exposure to a bewildering array of microbes, chemical, and other disturbance agents—to which, humans and other Earth inhabitants must continually adapt. In all of this, the human-environment relationship is cyclical. Both parts of the relationship manifest change in the other setting up an ever changing dynamic.

The 2017-2018 College of the Environment Think Tank will focus upon how humanity will confront and take measure of the human-environment relationship from diverse perspectives of biochemistry, ecology, socio-political-religious, somatics, art, and embodiment.

Thank you,

2017-18 Think Tank Members
Katja Kolcio, Chair and Professor of Dance
Ishita Mukerji, Professor of Integrative Science and Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
Marguerite Nguyen, Assistant Professor of English and East Asian Studies
Eiko Otake, Menakka and Essel Bailey ’66 Distinguished Visiting Scholar in the College of the Environment
Helen Poulos, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Environment Studies

The Orientation Program is seeking four to five Interns to assist with the planning and implementation of the Orientation Program for the incoming Class of 2022 and the new transfer, exchange & visiting students. Interns plan both International Student Orientation (ISO) and New Student Orientation (NSO) with position responsibilities varying based on specific assignments.

Do you want to make a difference but just need the funding to do it?

The Patricelli Center is offering three $5,000 Seed Grants, a $10,000 Projects for Peace Grant and several $4,000 Summer Experience Grants. These grants are open to anyone with an idea for a social venture or social impact project that they want to launch or grow. Applications due 1/28!
If you would like to learn more or get help on your application, stop by Drop-In hours 12/11-12/13 from 12:00-1:00 pm in Allbritton 022.

For more info visit the Patricelli Center or email engage@wesleyan.edu.

Dear Students,

Winter Session registration is open, and courses have started to fill. Please don’t wait to register; enrollment is on a first-come, first-served basis. Housing and Dining requests for Winter Session, Winter on Wyllys, and Teacher Generation will close at noon on Thursday, November 30. Review the information published on the Winter Session website (http://www.wesleyan.edu/wintersession), particularly the deadlines for registration, withdrawal, housing, dining, and more, and register as soon as possible to secure your seat.

How to Register for Winter Session Courses:
Navigate to Portal.
Go to the “Courses” Bucket and click on “Winter Session.”
Download and print the registration form.
Complete the registration form and have your advisor sign it.
Bring the signed, completed form to 74 Wyllys Avenue with full payment for tuition.
Students should bring their tuition payment in the form of a check or pre-payment on their student account so that the credit on their account is $3260 when they come to the Winter Session Office. Students awarded aid should bring a print-out of their aid letter and the balance of the tuition.
The office will not accept incomplete forms or forms that are not accompanied by full payment.
Students who are not currently on campus due to study abroad or leave should use the “Registration Information – Students not on Campus” link in the Winter Session bucket.

How to Request Housing:
Navigate to Portal.
Go to the “Courses” Bucket and click on “Winter Session.”
Click on the clink “Housing Request.”
Complete the online form.
Contact Residential Life (reslife@wesleyan.edu) with questions.

How to Request Dining:
Navigate to Portal.
Go to the “Courses” Bucket and click on “Winter Session.”
Click on the clink “Meal Plan Request.”
Complete the online form.

If you are interested in the Winter programs provided by the Career Center, please visit:

If you have any questions about Winter Session, please contact the Winter Session office at winter@wesleyan.edu or 860-685-2005.

De-Stress Zone

Deadline: February 2018

The Writing Workshop is starting a new series of peer-led, topic-specific workshops, and our first one is tomorrow evening, Thursday 11/9.

Gabriel Kachuk, COL ‘18
Shapiro Writing Center, Thursday 11/9, 6-7:15pm
Free food!

Senior COL major and Writing Workshop tutor Gabriel Kachuk will walk students through the ins and outs of close reading: what do I look for? How do I make it make sense? How far-reaching do I need to be? What if I don’t get it “right”?
This will be a lively, interactive, and very practical peer-to-peer workshop, with good food to boot!

Hey! Hablas español hasta que te toca decir una palabra that you don’t know how to say in Spanish?
Do you wonder why some words in Spanish have accents and some don’t?

This is the class for you!

SPAN 203: Spanish for Heritage Speakers
Spring 2018; T-Th 1:30 – 2:45 pm
A course taught at Trinity College and offered to Wesleyan students by telepresence, with plenty of academic and technical support at the home campus, both during and outside of class.

This course is designed for heritage speakers–students who understand and speak Spanish, who grew up in a Spanish-speaking environment, but whose education was primarily in English, in the US. This course, offers many benefits, such as:
• Study Spanish in an academic setting in the same way that native English-speakers study English
• Polish both oral and written language skills in Spanish
• Learn more about your language and your cultural heritage
• Meet students with similar interests and experiences
• Gain awareness and understanding of the Hispanic/Latin@ cultures: i.e., identity and communities inside and outside the US, language variation, geography, history, customs and traditions, current events, music, arts and food
• Prepare for study abroad
• Increase internship and career opportunities
• Can count towards the HISP major

Interested? Please contact Profesora Pérez-Gironés: aperezgirone@wesleyan.edu (127 Downey House; office hours: Monday 1:30-2:30, Wednesday 3-4, and by appointment.)

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